escendants of homas astings

                                            

  The Hastings Memorial Website
www.Thomas-Hastings.org

A collaborative effort between Scott Billigmeier, Louise Hastings, Ann Guenther and Julie Hastings-Barnes

 


 

 

FACEBOOK

♥  Thomas Hastings Y- DNA Project

This website is dedicated to our immigrant ancestor, his fore-fathers and the
Descendants of Thomas Hastings (c1605 - 1685) of England and Watertown, Mass.

** Visit us on and become a "Fan."  New photos and posts every week **

 

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WWW www.thomas-hastings.org

 

 

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1.  John Hastings (1722-1804) of Charlestown, N.H.
2.  His wife, Susannah (Willard) Hastings (*also a Hastings descendant in her own right).
3.  Franklin Williams Hastings (1839-1928) of Ohio and Pennsylvania.
4.  James McClelland Hastings (1864-1938) of Sacramento, Calif.
5.  Almon W. (1839-1922) & Maryette (Person) Hastings family of Windham Co., Vermont and Greene Co., Iowa.

Photo Legend

This graphic is composed of photographs of descendants of Thomas Hastings and his signature from September 10, 1660.  The Thomas Hastings descendants shown are, in order, starting on the right.

6.  Henry Toler Hastings-Brown (1859-1932) of California.
7.  Elbridge Gerry Hastings (1860-1938) of Suffield, Conn.
8.  James Hannum Hastings (1830-1890) of Groton, Ohio.
9.  Justus Warner Hastings (c1857-?) and family of Medina Co., Ohio.
10. Ephraim Hastings (1803-1884) of Penn. and Ohio.
11. Johann William Claudius & Sarah Lucinda (Hastings) (1872-1932) Groth family of Pennsylvania and Virginia.

Note about photo selection:  In picking the photos contained in our logo, we exercised an editors prerogative and selected pictures that, for the most part, came from our own Hastings lines.  Geographically speaking, they are not completely representative of the Hastings migrational patterns.  Had we selected randomly from the pool of known Hastings descendants (pre-1900), the states of Massachusetts, Vermont, Connecticut, New York and the Upper Midwest would have been much more heavily represented -- and states like Pennsylvania and Virginia would occur rarely.